Seldovia Public Library

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10/28: New at the library this week

Posted by Laura Haskins - Library Director on October 30, 2009

Audiobooks

Suspect / Michael Robotham (unabridged; cassettes)
At forty-two, psychiatrist Joe O’Loughlin seems to have it all: a thriving practice, a beautiful wife, an adoring daughter. But Joe’s snug, happy world is crumbling. Recently diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, he’s dreading the inevitable and all too palpable deterioration of his body and mind. Then, when the police ask for his help in solving the brutal murder of a woman they assume is a prostitute, he’s horrified to recognize the victim as a nurse he once worked with, and with whom he had a bit of a past. As Joe begins to suspect that one of his patients may be responsible, the police zero in on him.(read a sample chapter)

Mark Twain / Geoffrey C. Ward; Dayton Duncan; Ken Burns (unabridged; two copies: cassettes & CD)
A companion audiobook to the 4-hour PBS television series.
Using material from Twain’s works, diaries, and letters, Mark Twain follows the great writer/humorist/lecturer/people’s philosopher from the Hannibal, Missouri of his childhood, to the Europe and Middle East of his travels (and hilarious travel books); from his beginnings as a newspaperman to his storied life as (in his own words) “the most conspicuous man on the planet.”(read an exerpt)

The rise of Theodore Roosevelt / Edmund Morris (abridged; cassettes)
A biography published on the 100th anniversary of Theodore Roosevelt becoming president. (read a sample chapter)

The king of torts / John Grisham (unabridged; cassettes)
The office of the public defender is not known as a training ground for bright young litigators. Clay Carter has been there too long and, like most of his colleagues, dreams of a better job in a real firm. When he reluctantly takes the case of a young man charged with a random street killing, he assumes it is just another of the many senseless murders that hit D.C. every week.

As he digs into the background of his client, Clay stumbles on a conspiracy too horrible to believe. He suddenly finds himself in the middle of a complex case against one of the largest pharmaceutical companies in the world, looking at the kind of enormous settlement that would totally change his life—that would make him, almost overnight, the legal profession’s newest king of torts… (read an exerpt)

World without end / Ken Follett (CD; unabridged)
The cathedral and the priory are again at the center of a web of love and hate, greed and pride, ambition and revenge, but this sequel stands on its own. This time the men and women of an extraordinary cast of characters find themselves at a crossroad of new ideas— about medicine, commerce, architecture, and justice. In a world where proponents of the old ways fiercely battle those with progressive minds, the intrigue and tension quickly reach a boiling point against the devastating backdrop of the greatest natural disaster ever to strike the human race—the Black Death. (read a sample chapter)

Movies:

Meerkat manor
The man in the moon

(all movies are on dvd unless otherwise noted)

Books:

Women, work, and the art of savoir fair / Mireille Guiliano
When Mireille Guiliano became a senior executive and spokesperson for Veuve Clicquot, she took the Champagne to the top of the luxury market, using her distinctive French woman’s philosophy and style. Now she uses those same talents and savoir faire to help readers pop their own corks and get the mostout of life. Drawing on her experiences at the front lines and highest echelons of the business world, she gives women (and a few men, peut-être) the practical advice they need to make the most of work without skimping on all the other good things in life.

With lively lessons, stories, and helpful hints, Mireille teaches every reader how to identify her own passions and talents, improve her communication skills, balance work and life, cope with everyday stress, turn herself into a winning brand, and so much more. From acing a job interview or performance review to hosting a simple but elegant dinner party, Mireille tells it like it is as she shares her secrets for achieving happiness and success at any stage in business and life. (read an exerpt)

Suspect / Michael Robotham
At forty-two, psychiatrist Joe O’Loughlin seems to have it all: a thriving practice, a beautiful wife, an adoring daughter. But Joe’s snug, happy world is crumbling. Recently diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease, he’s dreading the inevitable and all too palpable deterioration of his body and mind. Then, when the police ask for his help in solving the brutal murder of a woman they assume is a prostitute, he’s horrified to recognize the victim as a nurse he once worked with, and with whom he had a bit of a past. As Joe begins to suspect that one of his patients may be responsible, the police zero in on him. (read a sample chapter)

A touch of dead: Sookie Stackhouse: the complete stories / Charlaine Harris
Cocktail waitress Sookie Stackhouse is no typical southern belle. She can read minds. And she’s got a thing for vampires. Which, in a town like Bon Temps, Louisiana, means she’ll have to watch her back — and neck…

Draw baby animals / Jane Maday
Who can resist the appeal of adorable baby animals? From their big, round eyes to their soft, cuddly fur, these little creatures are a special delight.

Now you can learn to draw all your favorites following the step-by-step instruction in this unique guide. It’s fun and easy, even if you’re new to drawing. Just start at the beginning to discover all the tips and tricks for drawing eyes, ears, muzzles, paws and feet. Once you’ve got the basics down, you can move on to creating realistic drawings of all kinds of sweet baby animals, including puppies, kittens, bunnies, lambs, foals, penguins, ducklings, fawns, piglets and more.

In every complete demonstration, you’ll find extra instruction for rendering the unique texture of baby fur and feathers. There’s also an in-depth chapter that shows you how to use drawing pencils, select reference photos, create compositions and establish proportions.

Look at the birdie: unpublished short fiction / Kurt Vonnegut
In this series of perfectly rendered vignettes, written just as he was starting to find his comic voice, Kurt Vonnegut paints a warm, wise, and funny portrait of life in post—World War II America–a world where squabbling couples, high school geniuses, misfit office workers, and small-town lotharios struggle to adapt to changing technology, moral ambiguity, and unprecedented affluence.

Here are tales both cautionary and hopeful, each brimming with Vonnegut’s trademark humor and profound humanism. A family learns the downside of confiding their deepest secrets into a magical invention. A man finds himself in a Kafkaesque world of trouble after he runs afoul of the shady underworld boss who calls the shots in an upstate New York town. A quack psychiatrist turned “murder counselor” concocts a novel new outlet for his paranoid patients. While these stories reflect the anxieties of the postwar era that Vonnegut was so adept at capturing– and provide insight into the development of his early style–collectively, they have a timeless quality that makes them just as relevant today as when they were written. It’s impossible to imagine any of these pieces flowing from the pen of another writer; each in its own way is unmistakably, quintessentially Vonnegut.

Half broke horses / Jeannette Walls
Those old cows knew trouble was coming before we did.” So begins the story of Lily Casey Smith, in Jeannette Walls’s magnificent, true-life novel based on her no-nonsense, resourceful, hard working, and spectacularly compelling grandmother. By age six, Lily was helping her father break horses. At fifteen, she left home to teach in a frontier town — riding five hundred miles on her pony, all alone, to get to her job. She learned to drive a car (“I loved cars even more than I loved horses. They didn’t need to be fed if they weren’t working, and they didn’t leave big piles of manure all over the place”) and fly a plane, and, with her husband, ran a vast ranch in Arizona. She raised two children, one of whom is Jeannette’s memorable mother, Rosemary Smith Walls, unforgettably portrayed in The Glass Castle.

Lily survived tornadoes, droughts, floods, the Great Depression, and the most heartbreaking personal tragedy. She bristled at prejudice of all kinds — against women, Native Americans, and anyone else who didn’t fit the mold. (read an exerpt)

True blue / David Baldacci
Mason “Mace” Perry was a firebrand cop on the D.C. police force until she was kidnapped and framed for a crime. She lost everything-her badge, her career, her freedom-and spent two years in prison. Now she’s back on the outside and focused on one mission: to be a cop once more. Her only shot to be a true blue again is to solve a major case on her own, and prove she has the right to wear the uniform. But even with her police chief sister on her side, she has to work in the shadows: A vindictive U.S. attorney is looking for any reason to send Mace back behind bars. Then Roy Kingman enters her life.

Roy is a young lawyer who aided the poor until he took a high-paying job at a law firm in Washington. Mace and Roy meet after he discovers the dead body of a female partner at the firm. As they investigate the death, they start uncovering surprising secrets from both the private and public world of the nation’s capital.

Going after Cacciato / Tim O’Brien
In a blend of reality and fantasy, this novel tells the story of a young soldier who one day lays down his rifle and sets off on a quixotic journey from the jungles of Indochina to the streets of Paris. In its memorable evocation of men both fleeing from and meeting the demands of battle, Going After Cacciato stands as much more than just a great war novel. Ultimately it’s about the forces of fear and heroism that do battle in the hearts of us all. (read a sample chapter)

If I die in a combat zone, box me up and ship me home / Tim O’Brien
Before writing his award-winning Going After Cacciato, Tim O’Brien gave us this intensely personal account of his year as a foot soldier in Vietnam. The author takes us with him to experience combat from behind an infantryman’s rifle, to walk the minefields of My Lai, to crawl into the ghostly tunnels, and to explore the ambiguities of manhood and morality in a war gone terribly wrong. Beautifully written and searingly heartfelt, If I Die in a Combat Zone is a masterwork of its genre. (read an exerpt)

Pursuit of honor / Vince Flynn
The action begins six days after a series of explosions devastated Washington, D.C., targeting the National Counterterrorism Center and killing 185 people, including public officials and CIA employees. It was a bizarre act of extreme violence that called for extreme measures on the part of elite counterterrorism operative Mitch Rapp and his trusted team member, Mike Nash. Now that the initial shock of the catastrophe is over, key Washington officials are up in arms over whether to make friends or foes of the agents who stepped between the enemy’s bullets and countless American lives regardless of the legal consequences. Not for the first time, Rapp finds himself in the frustrating position of having to illustrate the realities of national security to politicians whose view from the sidelines is inevitably obstructed.

Meanwhile, three of the al Qaeda terrorists are still at large, and Rapp has been unofficially ordered to find them by any means necessary. No one knows the personal, physical, and emotional sacrifices required of the job better than Rapp. When he sees Nash cracking under the pressure of the mission and the memories of the horrors he witnessed during the terrorist attack, he makes a call he hopes will save his friend, assuage the naysayers on Capitol Hill, and get him one step closer to the enemy before it’s too late. (read an exerpt)

After / Francine Prose
School has become a prison.
No one knows why.
There’s no way to stop it. (Age Range: Young Adult)

Maisy goes to the library / Lucy Cousins
Maisy likes going to the library.
She loves to read a book in a nice, quiet place.

Today, Maisy wants to read a book about fish, but she can only find books about birds or tigers. So she explores some of the other things to do in the library, like using the computer, making copies, listening to music, or looking at fish in the aquarium. Aha! Finally Maisy finds a sparkly book all about fish. But just as she settles into a corner to read, along come Cyril, Tallulah, Eddie, and Ostrich — and they all have noisier activities on their minds! (Age Range: For infants or children in preschool)

Maisy goes to the museum / Lucy Cousins
On a rainy-day visit to the museum, Maisy and her friends explore everything from dinosaurs to a moon exhibit, from vintage vehicles to a giant dollhouse to the food exhibit. There’s always something new (or old) to see at a museum, and for little readers, it’s good to have a friend like Maisy along for the adventure. (Age Range: For infants or children in preschool)

The spirit of Christmas / Nancy Tillman
A celebration of the most magical holiday of the year. (Age Range: 4 to 8; read an exerpt)

Puppy too small / Cyndy Szekeres
I’m too small!” wails Puppy every time he sees a doorknob too high to reach, a tree too tall to climb, or a chair too heavy to carry. But with a little help from his family and friends, Puppy soon realizes that there are many things he can do…and that he’s just the right size after all. (Age Range: 4 to 6)

Sammy’s special day / Cyndy Szekeres
Sammy can’t wait—his friend Thumpity is coming to visit! But when Thumpity arrives, a very bossy Sammy refuses to share his chair, blocks, or truck. Can Mama find a clever way to show Sammy that while playing with toys can be fun, sharing them with a friend is even better? (Age Range: 4 to 6)

Thumpity Thump gets dressed / Cyndy Szekeres
Whether it’s windy, raining, or snowy outside, Thumpity can find the right clothes to wear! Children will get a delightful lesson in dressing for whatever the weather as they follow the lovable bunny throughout a very changeable day. (Age Range: 4 to 6)

Eliza’s kindergarten surprise / Alice B. McGinty
A kindergartener misses her mother at school until she makes a mommy doll. (Age Range: 4 to 8)

Dancing granny / Elizabeth Winthrop
Granny and her grandchild take a nighttime trip to the zoo, where the animals have prepared a fabulous party and Granny dances the night away.

Marley goes to school / John Grogan
It’s the first day of school, and Cassie is all set to go. So is her dog, Marley!

Although he’s told to stay, Marley digs a tunnel out of the backyard and sniffs his way to school. As he roams the halls looking for Cassie, he finds trouble instead. From wolfing down hot dogs in the cafeteria to setting free a bunch of mice in science class, Marley won’t stop until he locates his best friend. This lovable and rowdy dog may not be much of an academic, but he’s full of school spirit! (Age Range: For infants or children in preschool)

Little house, little town / Scott Beck
Simple, lyrical text and engaging illustrations take preschool children on a tour of life for a young family-mother, father, and baby-living in a cozy house in a lovely little town. (Age Range: 3 to 6)

Time to say I love you / Jane Kemp; Claire Walters
When is the best time to say “I love you”? In this sweet, touching story, a mother tries to choose a time to tell her little girl how much she loves her. Over the course of a beautiful day at the seaside, the two roam over sandy beaches and grassy hills as the mother searches for just the right time and spot. The short, atmospheric text is lovely to read aloud and includes plenty of spots for readers to stop and say those three magic words. (Age Range: 3 to 7)

Tangerines and tea: My grandparents and Me / Ona Gritz
Visiting grandparents is always an adventure, whether rooting through drawers, playing pretend, or relaxing and reading together in a comfortable chair. Join two boisterous siblings as they leave home to be guests on their grandparents’ farm during different seasons of the year. Providing fun rhymes like “the songs we sing while we sit on the swing,” and “an oak tree to climb one limb at a time,” both adults and children will have fun singing and reading along together, as they learn the alphabet! (Age Range: 3 to 8)

The pink house at the seashore / Deborah Blumenthal
A house can be more than just a shelter. Some houses are places where family traditions grow, where memories live.But what happens to the traditions and memories when the house is gone? After losing a beloved summer home to a treacherous storm, two children and their parents discover the affirming answer to this poignant question . . . together. (Age Range: 5 to 8)

And the train goes… / William Bee
CHUFF-CHUFF, CHUFFERTY-CHUFF…PUFF-PUFF, PUFFERTY-PUFF…Here’s one train you don’t want to miss! From the stout stationmaster to the chickens a-laying, from a traveling teapot to a chaotic class trip, the clever visual details aboard every teeming car will have readers riding this train again and again. Woo-wooooo! (Age Range: For infants or children in preschool)

[Note: All synopses are provided by the publisher unless otherwise noted and do not constitute reviews by the Seldovia Public Library.]

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