Seldovia Public Library

A Volunteer Library serving the Seldovia, Alaska community since 1935

  • Hours

    Sunday : Closed
    Monday : 2-4 pm
    Tuesday : 2-6 pm
    Wednesday : 12-4 pm
    Thursday : 2-6 pm
    Friday : 2-4 pm
    Saturday : 2-4 pm

    Closed on the following holidays: Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day, New Year’s Eve, New Year’s Day, 4th of July, and Easter

  • SEARCH THE LIBRARY’S CATALOG ONLINE

  • Next Library Board meeting

    Tuesday, April 18, 2017
  • Subscribe

  • Receive notifications of new posts by email.

    Join 133 other followers

  • Recent Posts

  • Archive categories

  • Archives by date

4/19: New at the library this week

Posted by Laura Haskins - Library Director on April 19, 2008

Movies:

Then & now : The Alaska oil spill at 20Prince William Sound Regional Citizens’ Advisory Council (dvd)

Books:

Oil! / Upton Sinclair
Sinclair fashioned a novel out of the oil scandals of the Harding administration, providing in the process a detailed picture of the development of the oil industry in Southern California. Bribery of public officials, class warfare, and international rivalry over oil production are the context for Sinclair’s story of a genial independent oil developer and his son, whose sympathy with the oilfield workers and socialist organizers fuels a running debate with his father. Senators, small investors, oil magnates, a Hollywood film star, and a crusading evangelist people the pages of this lively novel.

Snow angels / Stewart O’Nan
Arthur Parkinson is fourteen during the dreary winter of 1974, experiencing the confusing pangs of adolescence and the pain of his parents’ divorce. His world is shattered further by the sudden and violent death of Annie Marchand, his beloved former baby-sitter. Narrated by the adult Arthur, who continues to be haunted by memories, the story of a young man’s unraveling family and the circumstances leading up to Annie’s death forms the backdrop for an intimate tale of the price of love and belonging, told in a spare, translucent, and unexpectedly tender voice.

Armageddon in retrospect / Kurt Vonnegut
Armageddon in Retrospect is a collection of twelve new and unpublished writings on war and peace. Imbued with Vonnegut’s trademark rueful humor, the pieces range from a visceral nonfiction recollection of the destruction of Dresden during World War II—an essay that is as timely today as it was then—to a painfully funny short story about three Army privates and their fantasies of the perfect first meal upon returning home from war, to a darker, more poignant story about the impossibility of shielding our children from the temptations of violence. Also included are Vonnegut’s last speech as well as an assortment of his artwork, and an introduction by the author’s son, Mark Vonnegut.

The namesake / Jhumpa Lahiri
The Namesake takes the Ganguli family from their tradition-bound life in Calcutta through their fraught transformation into Americans. On the heels of their arranged marriage, Ashoke and Ashima Ganguli settle together in Cambridge, Massachusetts. An engineer by training, Ashoke adapts far less warily than his wife, who resists all things American and pines for her family. When their son is born, the task of naming him betrays the vexed results of bringing old ways to the new world. Named for a Russian writer by his Indian parents in memory of a catastrophe years before, Gogol Ganguli knows only that he suffers the burden of his heritage as well as his odd, antic name.
(read a sample chapter)

Unaccustomed earth / Jhumpa Lahiri
In the stunning title story, Ruma, a young mother in a new city, is visited by her father who carefully tends her garden–where she later unearths evidence of a love affair he is keeping to himself. In “A Choice of Accommodations,” a couple’s romantic getaway weekend takes a dark turn at a party that lasts deep into the night. In “Only Goodness,” a woman eager to give her younger brother the perfect childhood she never had is overwhelmed by guilt, anguish and anger when his alcoholism threatens her family. And in “Hema and Kaushik,” a trio of linked stories–a luminous, intensely compelling elegy of life, death, love and fate–we follow the lives of a girl and boy who, one fateful winter, share a house in Massachusetts. They travel from innocence to experience on separate, sometimes painful paths, until destiny brings them together again years later in Rome.
(read an exerpt)

Belong to me / Marisa De los Santos
Everyone has secrets. Some we keep to protect ourselves, others to protect those we love. A devoted city dweller, Cornelia Brown surprised herself when she was gripped by the sudden desire to head for an idyllic suburb. Though she knows she’s made the right move, she approaches her new life with trepidation and struggles to forge friendships. Cornelia’s mettle is quickly tested by judgmental neighbor Piper Truitt, the embodiment of everything Cornelia feared she would find in suburbia. A saving grace soon appears in the form of Lake, and Cornelia develops an instant bond with this warm yet elusive woman.
(read an exerpt)

[Note: All synopses are provided by the publisher unless otherwise noted and do not constitute reviews by the Seldovia Public Library.]

Advertisements

Sorry, the comment form is closed at this time.

 
%d bloggers like this: